Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Laurence on Nagasaki

WAR DEPARTMENT
Bureau of Public Relations
PRESS BRANCH

EYE WITNESS ACCOUNT
ATOMIC BOMB MISSION OVER NAGASAKI

WITH THE ATOMIC BOMB MISSION TO JAPAN, AUGUST 9

We are on our way to bomb the mainland of Japan. Our flying contingent consists of three specially designed B-29 Superforts, and two of these carry no bombs. But our lead plane is on its way with another atomic bomb, the second in three days, concentrating its active substance, and explosive energy equivalent to 20,000, and under favorable conditions, 40,000 tons of TNT.

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Truman Statement on Hiroshima

THE WHITE HOUSE

Washington, D.C.

IMMEDIATE RELEASE —August 6, 1945

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Sixteen hours ago an American airplane dropped one bomb on Hiroshima, an important Japanese Army base. That bomb had more power than 20,000 tons of T.N.T. It had more than two thousand times the blast power of the British “Grand Slam” which is the largest bomb ever yet used in the history of warfare.

Szilard Petition

A PETITION TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

July 17, 1945

Discoveries of which the people of the United States are not aware may affect the welfare of this nation in the near future. The liberation of the atomic power which has been achieved places atomic bombs in the hands of the Army. It places in your hands, as Commander-in-Chief, the fateful decision whether or not to sanction the use of such bombs in the present phase of the war against Japan.

Interim Committee Report

Science Panel's Report to the Interim Committee

June 16, 1945

TOP SECRET

RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE IMMEDIATE USE OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS

You have asked us to comment on the initial use of the new weapon. This use, in our opinion, should be such as to promote a satisfactory adjustment of our international relations. At the same time, we recognize our obligation to our nation to use the weapons to help save American lives in the Japanese war.

The Franck Report

Report of the Committee on Political and Social Problems

Manhattan Project “Metallurgical Laboratory”

University of Chicago

June 11, 1945

 

V. Summary

The development of nuclear power not only constitutes an important addition to the technological and military power of the United States, but also creates grave political and economic problems for the future of this country.

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