Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

By the end of 1945, the atomic bombings of Japan had killed an estimated 140,000 people at Hiroshima and 74,000 at Nagasaki. Often lost in those numbers are the experiences of the survivors, known as the hibakusha.

The Franck Report

Soon after the Interim Committee concluded that the atomic bomb should be used as soon as possible against Japan, a group of scientists led by physicist James Franck founded a committee to study the question of the bomb's use.

Surveys of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Manhattan Project members participated in early missions to survey the two atomic bombing sites—Hiroshima and Nagasaki—after the Japanese surrender in August 1945.

Project Alberta

Project Alberta, also known as Project A, was a division of the Manhattan Project created to plan and carry out all the necessary steps for making the atomic bombs operational.

USS Indianapolis

The USS Indianapolis was a US Navy cruiser that delivered the components of the Little Boy atomic bomb to Tinian Island. It was later sunk by a Japanese submarine in what became the worst naval disaster in US history.

Debate over the Japanese Surrender

The debate over what precipitated the Japanese surrender at the end of World War II is a source of contention among historians. This debate has also figured prominently in the discussion of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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